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yoghurt fruit popsicles // the muffin myth

David Lebovitz says you should never apologize for being too busy to post because if the Pioneer Woman can run a ranch, homeschool her kids, and post practically every day, you can too. I’ll tell you straight up then; I haven’t posted in a week because I plain old wasn’t organized enough to schedule posts before I left for a week working in Falsterbo, in the south of Sweden.

 

I *was* actually organized enough to plan posts and shoot the photos before I left, and thinking I was being quite clever I put the photos into dropbox and figured I’d get some time to work on a computer over the course of the week. And that was clever, sure, but it turns out I’m not clever enough to figure out how to retrieve said photos from dropbox and get them uploaded onto this blog on a borrowed computer with an operating system different to that which I am used to, and a patchy (at the best of times) wifi connection. Apparently I’m not even clever enough to copy my instagram photos from my Facebook profile and paste them into this post. I’ve got big problems with technology, it would seem.

The good news is that I’ve got an armload of posts ready to go, and I’m officially now on vacation. Whoohoo! I’ve got a couple of days at home to get myself organized before I start blitzing around the world, so there should be no more postless weeks. I promise.

yoghurt fruit popsicles // the muffin myth

Here is something I made several times over the course of my week in the south; yoghurt fruit popsicles. If you’ve got a blender, a freezer, and popsicle molds you can have a dozen of these freezing up in a matter of minutes.

Even if you use full fat yoghurt, which I did, these popsicles are going to be way healthier than store bought versions. The yoghurt I used was 3% fat, and contributed a rich, creamy mouthfeel while still keeping these popsicles on the light side for a treat. In my books, this is a perfect summertime weeknight treat.

yoghurt fruit popsicles // the muffin myth

One year ago: Baked Ricotta
Two years ago: Banana Spelt Weekend Muffins

Yoghurt Fruit Popsicles Recipe:

How many popsicles you end up will largely be determined by the size of your molds. The little molds I picked up at a local market held about 1/4 cup each, so this recipe easily turned out a dozen popsicles.

Strawberry Yoghurt Popsicles:

1 pint strawberries, trimmed and rinsed well
1 cup plain yoghurt
2 Tbsp honey

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Banana Kiwi Yoghurt Popsicles:

1 large banana, peeled
1 ripe kiwi fruit, peeled and chopped into pieces
1 cup plain yoghurt
2 Tbsp honey

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Place your chose fruit into a blender or food processor with yoghurt and honey. Blend until very smooth. Pour equally into popsicle molds, and insert sticks. Freeze for at least 4 hours, or overnight. Rinse popsicle molds under hot water to release popsicles, serve, and enjoy!

What’s good about this? No matter what fruit you choose in your popsicles, it’s going to be good for you. Fresh, in season fruit is always a great source of dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Yoghurt is a great source of calcium, vitamin B12, and protein, to name a few. The live bacterial culture is very beneficial for digestive health, however, freezing destroy some of  that benefit in this case. Honey is a beautiful natural sweetener which has antioxidant and antifungal properties. Did you know honey has been used as athletic fuel and as a healing agent for thousands of years? Be mindful of a couple of things: first, your honey is only as good as the plants providing the pollen. Don’t skimp on honey, buy the good quality locally produced stuff. Second, calories are still calories. Honey is a great alternative to sugar, but it is a sweetener no less. We need to moderate.

All text and photos © The Muffin Myth 2012

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